Arugula

May 25th, 2010

Arugula

Arugula is a spicy green.  The arugula may be a bit holey but it does not detract from the flavor.  Arugula can be eaten raw alone or mixed with other salad greens.  It can also be sauteed.

Linguine with Arugula, Pine Nuts
and Parmesan Cheese

1 pound linguine
1/2 cup olive oil
4 ounces arugula, trimmed
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted
additional freshly grated Parmesan cheese

1. Cook linguine in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally.

2. Meanwhile, heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add arugula and stir until just wilted, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat.

3. Drain pasta and return to pot. Add arugula and toss well. Add 1 cup Parmesan and salt and pepper to taste; toss well.

4. Transfer to bowl. Sprinkle with pine nuts. Serve immediately, adding additional Parmesan, if desired.

from www.seasonalchef.com

Recipe: Pasta with Dark Greens

(Mostly just eat salad but here are a few tips.  Please share your favorites!)

Bok Choy

Bok Choy

When the time comes to start cooking, you”ll find that Bok Choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. With full-sized Bok Choy you”ll want to separate the leaves from the stalks, as the thick stalks have a longer cooking time. Rinse both well and drain, then shred or cut across the leaves, and cut the stalks into small slices along the diagonal or as called for in the recipe. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the Bok Choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of Bok Choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes. Adjust the seasonings if desired, adding a bit of sugar during cooking, or stirring in sesame oil at the end. Whichever cooking method you choose, be sure not to overcook the Bok Choy – the stalks should be tender and the leaves just wilted.

I suggest using Bok Choy in a more robust stir fry, one that contains shrimp or chicken perhaps, along with bean sprouts, snow peas and other Chinese-restaurant type ingredients.
My main suggestion for Bok Choy? Experiment! Really, it”s hard to go wrong with this versatile vegetable in the kitchen.

Braising Greens

Braising Greens

Pasta with Dark Greens

2 pounds mix of broccoli raab, and Braising Greens
Kosher salt
1 pound orechiette, penne or other pasta
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic, chopped
Pinch dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
Freshly ground pepper and salt

•    In a large pot, bring 2 to 3 quarts of water to a boil.
•    While the water heats, trim the greens and wash them well. Cut the greens crosswise into 1-inch pieces or strips.
•    When the water comes to a boil, add 1 tablespoon of salt. Toss the greens into the boiling water; cook until they are almost tender but still bright green, 8 to 10 minutes. (The time will vary somewhat depending on what kind of greens you use. Testing them is the best way to know when they are done.) With a slotted spoon, remove greens from the pot and toss into a large bowl of cold water.
•    Add the pasta to the pot of water in which the greens were cooked. While the pasta cooks, squeeze the greens to remove as much water as possible. Fluff the greens to separate them, then set aside.
•    In a large, heavy skillet or a wok, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, just until the garlic begins to color. (Take care not to let it burn or the dish will taste bitter.) Add casino the pepper flakes. When the pasta is almost done, 10 to 12 minutes, add the drained greens to the pan and cook together for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove pan from the heat.
•    Drain the pasta, leaving a bit of water clinging to it. Add the pasta to the cooked greens; toss well. Season to taste with pepper and salt. Serve immediately with a loaf of the thick-crusted, whole-grain bread. Makes 4 to 6 servings.
Stars comments: I would skip squeezing and fluffing the greens personally and I would add cilantro and dill at the end and maybe a splash of Italian Salad Dressing.  I rarely follow a recipe through to the end.  I always change and adjust to my families taste or what I imagine would go well together.

(Mostly just eat salad but here are a few tips. Please share your favorites!)

Bok Choy –When the time comes to start cooking, you”ll find that Bok Choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. With full-sized Bok Choy you”ll want to separate the leaves from the stalks, as the thick stalks have a longer cooking time. Rinse both well and drain, then shred or cut across the leaves, and cut the stalks into small slices along the diagonal or as called for in the recipe. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the Bok Choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of Bok Choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes. Adjust the seasonings if desired, adding a bit of sugar during cooking, or stirring in sesame oil at the end. Whichever cooking method you choose, be sure not to overcook the Bok Choy – the stalks should be tender and the leaves just wilted.

I suggest using Bok Choy in a more robust stir fry, one that contains shrimp or chicken perhaps, along with bean sprouts, snow peas and other Chinese-restaurant type ingredients.

My main suggestion for Bok Choy? Experiment! Really, it”s hard to go wrong with this versatile vegetable in the kitchen.

Serrano Peppers

February 5th, 2010

How to Dry

Thread stems with heavy string placing hot peppers close together and making the strand as long as you wish. Hang in dry area with the air circulating freely around the strand. Takes several weeks. When using fresh or dried hot peppers, wear gloves to protect your hands because the oils in the peppers can cause severe burns. Don”t touch your face or eyes. If peppers do come in contact with your bare hands, wash thoroughly with soapy water. If burning persists, soak online casino hands in a bowl of milk.

Remedies for eating a pepper that is too hot for you:

Drink milk, rinsing the mouth with it while swallowing, ice cream or yogurt. Eat rice or bread which will absorb the capsaicin. Drink tomato juice or eat a fresh lime or lemon

* Do not drink water – it will distribute the oil to more parts of the mouth.

Arugula

October 5th, 2009

rugula — is a spicy little leaf, which some describe as bitter and others characterize as having a “pepperymustardy” flavor. Because it is so potent on its best online casino own, it is often mixed with milder greens to produce a nice balanced salad. It can also be sautéed in olive oil. In Italy, arugula is often used in pizzas, added just before the baking period ends or immediately afterwards, so that it won't wilt in the heat

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Lakota Squash

October 5th, 2009

Lakota Squash—Heirloom seed. A unique variety, once cherished by the Lakota Sioux, and distinctly shaped like an overgrown pear. Features a deep orange flesh with dark green
blotches and grows between 3-7 lbs. The fine grained orange flesh has a mild sweet and nutty flavor.

How to Freeze Pumpkin

September 28th, 2009

Freezing is the easiest way to preserve extra pumpkin, and it yields the best quality product. An added advantage—you can freeze pumpkin puree in the amounts needed for your favorite recipes.

Wash, cut into cooking-size sections and remove seeds. Cook until soft in boiling water, in online casino steam, in a pressure cooker or in an oven. Remove pulp from rind and mash. To cool, place pan containing pumpkin in cold water and stir occasionally. domain list Package, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Seal and freeze.

Carrot and Radish Salad

September 28th, 2009

1 bunch of small carrots
4 radishes
1
small handful of chopped fresh
flat leaf parsley
really good olive oil
apple cider vinegar
finely ground sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of butter
a pinch of sugar

Gently scrub the carrots to remove any dirt. There is no need to peel these smallish carrots. Cut them into slices, across the carrot, on a bias, about 1/4″ thick. Cut the radishes really thinly into slices.

Put the carrots in a large saute pan.

Put enough cold water into the pan to almost cover the carrots. Add the butter to this, and the pinch of sugar. what is my dns server Put a lid on the pan, and get it boiling over a high heat. Once
boiling, remove the lid. Let this boil until the liquid has reduced right down, and the carrots are almost cooked through. The aim of this is to judge things perfectly. You have it spot on when the carrots are just about cooked through, and the liquid in the pan has been reduced cooking. The pan dries out before the carrots are cooked? Add a little more water. It might take a couple of goes to get the perfect glaze, but it is really worth it.

Let the carrots cool a little in the pan. When cooled, toss them in a bowl with the radish slices. Toss in the parsley, and a generous serving of salt and freshly ground black pepper. Add a good glug of olive oil, and a splash of the cider vinegar. I am not giving you exact measurements. In this case you just cannot. The amount of oil depends on how much carrots and radishes you have. The amount of vinegar depends on this too, and how sharp your vinegar is. My suggestion is to add a little vinegar to start, and give it a taste. If you cannot taste the sharpness from the vinegar, then add a wee bit more. You can always add more, but you can never take it out if you add too much!

Finally toss in the parsley, and mix up. I like to let it sit for a few minutes before eating, just to let all the flavors get friendly. This goes great with some grilled seafood, and bread