Pea Tendrils

May 25th, 2010

Pea Tendrils

Pea tendrils are the edible young leaves and shoots of a pea plant. They often contain curly vines and flowering buds. They have a distinctive and robust flavor that tastes like a cross between sweet peas and spinach.  Pea tendrils are delicious steamed or lightly sauteed with oil, garlic, and salt.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 pound pea tendrils (about 8 cups chopped, loosely packed)
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen grated coconut
  • 2 green cayenne chilies, finely chopped
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup scallions, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon tumeric
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Wash the pea tendrils and drain. Gather them into a tight bundle and finely slice crosswise.
  2. Combine with all the other ingredients in a medium heavy pot and mix well.
  3. Place over high heat and cook, stirring frequently, for about 1 minute. Then cover tightly and cook for about 3 minutes, until the pea tendrils have wilted and the scallions are tender. Serve on a flat plate.  adapted from recipe at www.chow.com

Arugula

May 25th, 2010

Arugula

Arugula is a spicy green.  The arugula may be a bit holey but it does not detract from the flavor.  Arugula can be eaten raw alone or mixed with other salad greens.  It can also be sauteed.

Linguine with Arugula, Pine Nuts
and Parmesan Cheese

1 pound linguine
1/2 cup olive oil
4 ounces arugula, trimmed
1 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted
additional freshly grated Parmesan cheese

1. Cook linguine in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally.

2. Meanwhile, heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add arugula and stir until just wilted, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat.

3. Drain pasta and return to pot. Add arugula and toss well. Add 1 cup Parmesan and salt and pepper to taste; toss well.

4. Transfer to bowl. Sprinkle with pine nuts. Serve immediately, adding additional Parmesan, if desired.

from www.seasonalchef.com

When do I pick up my CSA share?

May 17th, 2010

If your wondering when you get to pick-up that first box of scrumptious veggies here is the schedule for the 2010 growing season!

Email me with any questions csa@keewaydinfarms.com

All Standard and Double Shares begin Wednesday June 2nd!

If you have an Every Other Week (EOW) Share I have divided the pick-up days to even out our harvest.

This means if you pick-up at 144 Hickory Ct., Oregon (3-6pm) ; 1500 Fairfax Ct., Waunakee (3-6pm) ; or 2422 Commonwealth Ave., Madison (4-7pm) your first delivery will be on June 2nd and every other week until October 6th.

If you pick-up at Bloom Bake Shop 1834 Parmenter St., Middleton (pick-up 3-6pm) ; 1012 Lowell St., Madison (pick-up 4-7pm)  ; or Quality Bicycle Parts, Minnesota your first delivery will be on June 9th and every other week until October 13th

Find the box with your last name (or the name of the Primary Household with whom you are sharing) marked on the box.  Find the check off sheet provided at your pick-up site and check of the appropriate box.  Leave last weeks box neatly folded for your site host, to be picked up by our driver.

You may bring your own bags and transfer your produce and leave the waxed box.  Or you may take the box with you, carefully fold and store to be returned at your next pick-up.  We thank you in advance for taking care of these reusable boxes.

Please make sure that anyone you send in your place to pick-up your box knows these instructions.  Thank your site host for sharing there space.  We appreciate your efforts to make the pick-ups run smoothly.

Family Farming

May 12th, 2010

As a family farmer I have had the honor and challenge of getting my work done with children attached to my legs.  I”ve gotten quite good at harvesting one handed with a child at my hip.  Sometimes I wake Aurora (our four year old) and we go directly to the greenhouse or the fields for the day.

Aurora,  more than her older sister Karma, was raised in the greenhouse eating organic potting soil, bugs, and leafy greens.  As I am busy working and Aurora whines that she is hungry I just pick something edible, raw and unwashed for her to eat, right there in the field, with a drink out of the hose to finish it off.

Aurora sneaking cherry tomatoes for breakfast in her housecoat!

Aurora sneaking cherry tomatoes for breakfast in her housecoat!

Aurora could now be the poster child for the raw foods movement.  She does not like the smell of food frying like the rest of us and don”t bother cooking that carrot if you want her to eat it.  She would prefer chomping on a head of raw cabbage  to a plate of spaghetti any day of the week!  She”s a tough little farm girl who is not bothered by being wet, cold, or sick and she is the first to volunteer to help with any job.  At four years old I can already tell that she will be an independant, hard working, confident woman who is in touch with Mother Best Casinos For French casino Roulette We list the best casinos for playing roulette: French Style. Nature.  No matter where life takes her. ip adr . These are the character building traits of farm life.

Family farming is a great challenge that forces me to be patient, to slow down and enjoy the work I”m doing rather than rush through it in a blaze of glory.  My children remind me with their insistance to stop and look around at this beautiful life that we live as they show me a new flower or bug they have found.  (Aurora had a pet slug for a few days living in a morel mushroom.) They help me to accept that the work will never be done and that”s part of the beauty of farming.  Even though it is hard work I know that I will look back on these days, working with my children beside me,  as the best days of my life.

We flow with the seasons, together, creating and recreating our life together, living off the land!

Keewaydin Family

Keewaydin Family

Green Garlic and Garlic Scapes

May 12th, 2010

Everyone knows about Garlic but few realize you can eat it immature.  Green Garlic and Garlic Scapes can not be found in the grocery store.  They have a more mild garlic taste than the mature garlic and should be stored unwashed in a paper bag in your refrigerator.

Green garlic or young garlic should be cut lengthwise and rinsed in between the layers where sand and soil can slip in.  Then use as you would garlic cloves.  Use finely chopped green garlic or garlic scapes in stir fry, sauces, or pasta dishes.  Try it raw in tuna salad or sauteed in pasta salad and salad dressings.

Today you received just enough to taste but more is on the way!

More suggestions for Braising Greens and Dark Greens

May 12th, 2010

Braising greens, Kale, Broccoli Raab and Swiss Chard can be chopped and tossed into a stir fry in the last minute or two, or saute it on it’s own in butter or olive oil.  The greens can also be added to scrambled eggs, omelets or frittatas.  Greens can be prepared southern-style, like collards, with ham or bacon for a tasty side dish.

Recipe: Sweet and Sour Salad Dressing

May 10th, 2010

Having lots of Salad to eat should inspire you to try out some new salad dressings

1 cup salad oil

1/2 cup sugar

1/3 cup catsup

1/4 cup vinegar

2 tablespoons grated onion

2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce

Combine the oil, sugar, catsup, vinegar, onion and Worcestershire in a blender Bonus Russian roulette casino : Obtenez 3+ pistolet de type colt pour déclencher ce bonus. and chill.

Toss the salad with the dressing.  Excess dressing keeps well in refrigerator for up to one week.

Salad Mix

Salad Mix

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Keewaydin Family Farms presents our first ever Spring Greens CSA Share!

May 5th, 2010

keewaydin image

Thank you so much for joining us this season as CSA members and sharing with us the risks and bounty of a small family farm in Wisconsin!  We have had an early Spring this year so you will be enjoying in the variety of Spring Greens that are available.  As this is a new program I would appreciate your comments on your experience with this Share.

I am experimenting with ways to keep the delicate salad greens cool as they wait at the pick-up sites.  Today we tried placing a bag of ice in the box.  I am looking into Techni-ICE and Styrofoam coolers as well.  If something in your box is wilted soak in very cold water before placing in the fridge.  Remove the greens from the radishes before storing.  Cilantro and dill can be placed in a glass with water in the bottom and kept on the counter or refrigerator for several days.

Please remember to wash all of your veggies and salad mixes again.  We have a dunk tank and a large salad spinner no fancy machinery or wash lines here.  We wash them once and pick through as best we can but don’t be offended if we missed something.  An occasional hole in a leaf is your guarantee that we are organic.  We do not even spray so called “organic chemicals” that are now allowed in organic farming.   We are a small farm with few employees.  There are only several faces behind your box full of salad fixing’s.   I feel that it is important that when a family sits down over dinner they know who brought the food to their plates and they know where it came from.

Please contact me with any questions or concerns Star 608-606-0373 or csa@keewaydinfarms.com

Star Maule Keewaydin CSA mangager

Star Maule Keewaydin CSA mangager

Recipe: Pasta with Dark Greens

(Mostly just eat salad but here are a few tips.  Please share your favorites!)

Bok Choy

Bok Choy

When the time comes to start cooking, you”ll find that Bok Choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. With full-sized Bok Choy you”ll want to separate the leaves from the stalks, as the thick stalks have a longer cooking time. Rinse both well and drain, then shred or cut across the leaves, and cut the stalks into small slices along the diagonal or as called for in the recipe. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the Bok Choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of Bok Choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes. Adjust the seasonings if desired, adding a bit of sugar during cooking, or stirring in sesame oil at the end. Whichever cooking method you choose, be sure not to overcook the Bok Choy – the stalks should be tender and the leaves just wilted.

I suggest using Bok Choy in a more robust stir fry, one that contains shrimp or chicken perhaps, along with bean sprouts, snow peas and other Chinese-restaurant type ingredients.
My main suggestion for Bok Choy? Experiment! Really, it”s hard to go wrong with this versatile vegetable in the kitchen.

Braising Greens

Braising Greens

Pasta with Dark Greens

2 pounds mix of broccoli raab, and Braising Greens
Kosher salt
1 pound orechiette, penne or other pasta
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 cloves garlic, chopped
Pinch dried red pepper flakes, or to taste
Freshly ground pepper and salt

•    In a large pot, bring 2 to 3 quarts of water to a boil.
•    While the water heats, trim the greens and wash them well. Cut the greens crosswise into 1-inch pieces or strips.
•    When the water comes to a boil, add 1 tablespoon of salt. Toss the greens into the boiling water; cook until they are almost tender but still bright green, 8 to 10 minutes. (The time will vary somewhat depending on what kind of greens you use. Testing them is the best way to know when they are done.) With a slotted spoon, remove greens from the pot and toss into a large bowl of cold water.
•    Add the pasta to the pot of water in which the greens were cooked. While the pasta cooks, squeeze the greens to remove as much water as possible. Fluff the greens to separate them, then set aside.
•    In a large, heavy skillet or a wok, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, just until the garlic begins to color. (Take care not to let it burn or the dish will taste bitter.) Add casino the pepper flakes. When the pasta is almost done, 10 to 12 minutes, add the drained greens to the pan and cook together for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove pan from the heat.
•    Drain the pasta, leaving a bit of water clinging to it. Add the pasta to the cooked greens; toss well. Season to taste with pepper and salt. Serve immediately with a loaf of the thick-crusted, whole-grain bread. Makes 4 to 6 servings.
Stars comments: I would skip squeezing and fluffing the greens personally and I would add cilantro and dill at the end and maybe a splash of Italian Salad Dressing.  I rarely follow a recipe through to the end.  I always change and adjust to my families taste or what I imagine would go well together.

(Mostly just eat salad but here are a few tips. Please share your favorites!)

Bok Choy –When the time comes to start cooking, you”ll find that Bok Choy is extremely adaptable. Boiling, steaming, stir-frying and even deep-frying are all possibilities. With full-sized Bok Choy you”ll want to separate the leaves from the stalks, as the thick stalks have a longer cooking time. Rinse both well and drain, then shred or cut across the leaves, and cut the stalks into small slices along the diagonal or as called for in the recipe. When stir-frying, a good basic method is to stir-fry the Bok Choy for a minute, sprinkling with a bit of salt, then add a small amount of water or chicken broth (about 3 tablespoons per pound of Bok Choy) cover, and simmer for 2 minutes. Adjust the seasonings if desired, adding a bit of sugar during cooking, or stirring in sesame oil at the end. Whichever cooking method you choose, be sure not to overcook the Bok Choy – the stalks should be tender and the leaves just wilted.

I suggest using Bok Choy in a more robust stir fry, one that contains shrimp or chicken perhaps, along with bean sprouts, snow peas and other Chinese-restaurant type ingredients.

My main suggestion for Bok Choy? Experiment! Really, it”s hard to go wrong with this versatile vegetable in the kitchen.